LISNews:

Librarian And Information Science News
  1. Bookstore's Tweet On The Sale Of A Children's Book After 27 Years, Goes Viral : NPR
    Topic: 
    The store's tweet about the sale has since gone viral and received thousands of replies. Author Sarah Todd Taylor tweeted in response, "The book held its breath. It had hoped so often, only to have that hope crushed. Hands lifted it from the shelf, wrapped it warmly in paper. As the door closed on its past life, the book heard the soft cheers of its shelfmates."
    From Bookstore's Tweet On The Sale Of A Children's Book After 27 Years, Goes Viral : NPR
  2. The Competitive Book Sorters Who Spread Knowledge Around New York - Atlas Obscura
    Topic: 
    With minutes to go until game time, the 12 elite sorters have emerged, wearing matching BookOps T-shirts. They march toward the machine as if boarding Apollo 11. The offices upstairs have emptied into the basement, and a wide variety of library personnel fill every available space in the room to cheer the sorters on. “We’re gonna take ‘em down, it’s not gonna be an issue,” says Michael Genao, a 22-year-old sophomore sorter with a linebacker’s build. “I guarantee it,” he adds, as he paces between his teammates, the last few bites of a chocolate donut in his hand.
    From The Competitive Book Sorters Who Spread Knowledge Around New York - Atlas Obscura
  3. Booksellers Protest Amazon Site’s Move to Drop Stores From Certain Countries
    Topic: 
    More than 250 antiquarian book dealers in 24 countries say they are pulling over a million books off an Amazon-owned site for a week, an impromptu protest after the site abruptly moved to ban sellers from several nations. The flash strike against the site, AbeBooks, which is due to begin Monday, is a rare concerted action by vendors against any part of Amazon, which depends on third-party sellers for much of its merchandise and revenue. The protest arrives as increasing attention is being paid to the extensive power that Amazon wields as a retailer — a power that is greatest in books.
    From Booksellers Protest Amazon Site’s Move to Drop Stores From Certain Countries - The New York Times
  4. Harvard Converts Millions of Legal Documents into Open Data
    Topic: 
    A new free website spearheaded by the Library Innovation Lab at the Harvard Law School makes available nearly 6.5 million state and federal cases dating from the 1600s to earlier this year, in an initiative that could alter and inform the future availability of similar areas of public-sector big data. Led by the Lab, which was founded in 2010 as an arena for experimentation and exploration into expanding the role of libraries in the online era, the Caselaw Access Project went live Oct. 29 after five years of discussions, planning and digitization of roughly 100,000 pages per day over two years
    From Harvard Converts Millions of Legal Documents into Open Data
  5. In win for open access, two major funders to bar grantees from publishing in hybrid journals
    Topic: 
    The largest part of the policy change is that as of January 2020, Wellcome and Gates will no longer allow their grantees to publish in so-called hybrid OA journals, which have both subscription and free content. Most scientific journals now follow that hybrid business model, which allows authors to pay a fee if they want to make their articles OA. For the past decade, Wellcome has allowed its grantees to pay these fees, in part because it viewed them as a way to help publishers finance a switch in their business models to full OA. “We no longer believe it’s a transition,” says Robert Kiley, head of open research at the Wellcome. “We’re looking to bring about a change where all research is open access.”
    From In win for open access, two major funders to bar grantees from publishing in hybrid journals | Science | AAAS

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